Consequences of Untreated Mental Illness in Children and Adolescents

Suicide

Suicide is the third leading cause of death in youth ages 15 to 24. More teenagers and young adults die from suicide than from cancer, heart disease, AIDS, birth defects, stroke, pneumonia, influenza and chronic lung disease combined (U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Svcs., 2001).

  • More than 90% of children & adolescents who commit suicide have a mental disorder (Shaffer & Craft, 1999).
  • In the U.S., in the year 2002, almost 4,300 young people aged 10 to 24 died by suicide (Kochanek, Murphy, & Anderson, 2004).
  • States spend nearly $1 billion annually on medical costs associated with completed suicides and suicide attempts by youth up to 20 years of age (NGA Center for Best Practices, 2001).

School Failure

Approximately 50% of students age 14 and older who are living with a mental illness drop out of high school. This is the highest dropout rate of any disability group (U.S. Dept. of Education, 2001).

Juvenile and Criminal Justice Involvement

Youth with unidentified and untreated mental disorders also tragically end up in jails and prisons. According to a study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health—the largest ever undertaken—an alarming 65 percent of boys and 75 percent of girls in juvenile detention have at least one mental illness. “We are incarcerating youth living with mental illness, some as young as eight years old, rather than identifying their conditions early and intervening with appropriate treatment,” (Teplin, 2002).

Higher Health Care Utilization

When children with untreated mental disorders become adults, they use more health care services and incur higher health care costs than other adults. Left untreated, childhood disorders are likely to persist and lead to a downward spiral of school failure, limited or non-existent employment opportunities and poverty in adulthood. No other illnesses harm so many children so seriously.

 Dr. Mary Nord Cook, Mary Cook, Dr. Cook, Betsey Bucca, Kym Spring-Thompson, Jaimelynn Roets, therapist in denver, psychiatrist in Denver, expert psychiatrists, psychologists in Denver, family therapist in DTC, family therapist in Denver, my child won’t listen to me, my teen won’t listen to me, I don’t know how to help my child, teen mental health, child mental health, holistic therapy in Denver, holistic therapy in the Tech Center, Colorado, Denver, DTC, Tech Center, licensed clinical social worker, family therapy, I need help, behavioral problems in teens, where to find a therapist for my teen, how to find a therapist, mood problems, anxiety problems, resources for families with an ADD child, ADD, ADHD, mood disorders, suicide prevention, depression, group therapy in Denver, emotional health, emotional problems, problems in school, how to help my child with their behavior problems, solutions for the mental health crisis, strategies for mental health, mental health awareness, adolescent suicide rates, adolescent depression, adolescent mental health, trainings for pediatricians, resources for pediatricians, treatment for teens, treatment for adolescents, mental health treatment for children, pediatric consulting, pediatric mental health training courses, mental health groups for kids, how to help my kid do better in school, how to help my kid pay attentions, how to help my kid stop acting out, how to help my son with his behavior problems, how to help my daughter with her behavior problems, family care package scholarships, school consultation packages, nonprofit, non-profit, nonprofits in Colorado, where to find mental health nonprofit in Colorado, where to find a mental health wellness center in Colorado, integrity, clinicians, family interventions, collaboration, EMPOWER centers, nurse practitioners, credit, continuing education credit, Greenwood Village, DTC, Tech Center, wine smear and learn, untreated

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *